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My work includes a varied range of media depending on the desired outcome. Currently I’m exploring how people interact with objects and how to commodify my personal practice with an interdisciplinary package. There are different facets that operate symbiotically within umbrella practice.

Making art for yourself is a way to improve self value and enables a direction. But in terms of having a sustainable professional practice you need to make work for other people that will pay you for it to carry on beyond more solipsistic navel gazing. Artists can make a living out of visually heightening our encapsulated environment and to do this you need to finding your style and make money from it. Without any particular narrative, the intentions of my two dimensional work are to provide visual pleasure and delight: playing with the brain; colours together to make you tick; compositions and satisfying strokes; casting illusions of space tricking the viewers; deception; squeezing the viewer/consumer into satisfaction; creating a formula for nice things through visual designs.

We live in a world with an excess of consumption, eating up the planet’s resources and space. Art is yet another area of consumption, it is a currency that is valued and exchanged and serves to reinforce the social inequalities of capitalism. Practising ‘successful’ artists create a commodity that is valued and exchanged within pockets in the world. I struggle with this, there is a definite demand with the current climate situation, to rethink making yet more work to be consumed by the art world.

In my Biblical Bikes project: the bikes I sell were once destined for the bin, with a bit of love they can again be used every day. In an exchange of money and bikes I can fill my belly and also attend to what people use every day, producing practical tools. There is a constant demand for bikes as a medium of transport. I can use my art making ability and skills to fix things. Through building relationships with customers the Biblical Bikes project builds a social network that is both eco-friendly, limiting carbon emissions and counteracting our throw away culture.

With this thought; by curating as well as producing a range of products including those that support the higher art game I’d like to believe I’m working towards creating a sustainable art practice with the ingredients of longevity, design, resourcefulness, community and repairing. The reality of the capitalist world asks that if we are going to be more loving and eco friendly it needs also to be profitable. I produce various tools that contribute to how societies function. My artistic outputs themselves can be understood as a catalyst in enabling communities to function positively. As an artist I aim to embrace the duality of my role: both trying to fix this world and create reward for my labour.

I have been responding to mine and my peer groups interest of partying.I have been installing kinetic lights to heighten the visual experience of such an event. There is something interesting about a visual artist focusing on the curation light because all we see is just what light has been in reflected back in to our retina. So by producing light as an art form is raw compact unexpectable experience.It also is a very accessible form of art that people respond to the explosive entertainment, visually exiting spectacles with relevant collaboration of exiting contemporary music.

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Finn is currently on exchange to the Universität Liechtenstein. The last semester has undoubtably been challenging; starting the semester in a new country and choosing to stay through the pandemic. The work shown here is from this period, under Atelier Urs Meister and Carmen Rist.

The semester began with the development of a pedestal, which set the parameters for the project.

The primary design move – reflecting the past, by literally enveloping the footprint of the old courtyard, reflects this idea of a palimpsest. What was negative space becomes ‘space’. The scheme avoids, by mimicking the pre-existing, becoming a pastiche. On the other hand, it strives to not disregard the site, and its social/historical requirements.

The studio manifests a rigorous method of designing at every scale, starting from the micro to the macro, and this is reflected in the complexity and ambition of the proposal.

During the four months spent in Liechtenstein Finn has managed to expand his skillset in CAD and renderings in Rhino, producing work that is accomplished, despite the constraints created as a result of the pandemic.

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I am a Maltese Product Design Engineering student at the Glasgow School of Art and University of Glasgow. An MEng in Product Design Engineering at the two institutions has been an exciting and challenging journey, which has provided a multitude of opportunities in both engineering and design cultures.

My final year project, flexIV, was an exciting venture into the world of biomedical devices. flexIV is a stabilizing intravenous cannula for comfort and freedom. The device protects against dangerous accidental administration of an intravenous fluid into the subcutaneous tissue. This is known as extravasation, which is mainly caused due to movement and instability of the intravenous cannula. Extravasation causes painful side effects, as well as permanent cosmetic damage, loss of function in limbs, and potentially fatalities.

The flexIV device is an innovative redesign of the intravenous cannula. It introduces flexibility to the device to prevent internal catheter movement. With patient comfort in mind as well as extravasation prevention, the user is free to move comfortably without the worry of the catheter becoming displaced.

This project was an excellent opportunity to execute and improve my research skills, build professional relationships with a multitude of professions, and integrate my work ethic from my summer internship at ExxonMobil.

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I am a Third Year Student at the Glasgow School of Art, inspired by nature and human-centred design and focus on preservation, placemaking and sustainable building practices in my architectural work.
The musical retreat in Balloch strives to create a beautiful and calming environment to nurture the community and orchestral talents of children from the Big Noise organisation.
Sistema or Big Noise creates communities for vulnerable children through music, helping them engage with their studies, develop life skills and secure emotional wellbeing. To create a supportive environment for music, safety and serenity on the water I explored the typology of the docks as a safe space to tie down, subtly following the long narrows shapes of the boats, docks, paths, railway and the slipway.
The resulting courtyard structure serves as a protective boundary and the inward-oriented structure creates a community for the children who have come here to make music and connect as a group. To accommodate for the musical nature I’ve added domes, platforms and sloped objects to play with noise dispersion and perception, calling them acoustical wonders.
The appearance of the project was heavily influenced by several Latvian traditions such as Araisu Ezerpils to show an ancient protected community as well as ‘’Ezeru Skanas’’- floating musical performances.

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Rachel is a third year student of the BArch programme. Her practice is driven by sustainable design, having been awarded the Krystyna Johnson Prize in the second year of her studies for displaying exceptional ecological thought and intent to her practice from the outset.

Passionate about equal opportunities and broadening the routes of access to the profession, in the summer of 2019 Rachel worked under DisOrindary Architecture as a teaching and supporting staff member for UCL’s Architecture Beyond Sight pilot scheme commissioned by Professor Alan Penn, Dean of The Bartlett Faculty.

The project brief was to create a retreat for Sistema Scotland, a charity who tackle social inequality through musical education by fostering a sense of wellbeing, self-esteem and aspiration among the young people taking part.

Developing her response through orthographic drawings and an iterative model making process, Rachel responds sensitively to the landscape, drawing on both architecture and geology to unite the land with the Loch.

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Debora Gyimah works with a range of digital software to create architectural designs that tell a story. This project is a Residential Retreat resting in the unruly environment of Balloch. The retreat is a place to which children, teens and adults escape to learn and celebrate music in addition to building their social skills. The themes of this project are landscape, energy and culture.

The project explores landscape through materiality and placement. It deals with how the building instills itself into the environment and how it interacts with it. It also examines how the building can amalgamate its environment outside with that of the inside. Furthermore, the notion of placemaking is explored through landscaping. It allows the history of Balloch, the existing community, and the retreat to connect to one another.

Materiality also bleeds into the notion of energy. It is a factor that works in conjunction with form to create a design that conforms to the zero-carbon approach. Careful considerations were applied in the buildings form and materials for a design that is more sustainable.

Lastly, culture is explored by understanding those that will utilize the building, and their main goals, which are musical education and building communication skills. Tailored spaces are provided to accommodate these interests as well as other needs.

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By 2040, most of the world will have a severe supply to demand issue regarding the surface water. The purple represents countries that will face the struggles the most. As 97% of the world’s water is saltwater, 3% is frozen freshwater held in the glaciers and the remaining 1% is liquid water. Though in that 1%, some of it lies underground, making it very expensive to extract, with the only choice but to deplete surface freshwater.

What the speculative aim is to critique the careless free-flowing faucets which humans leave on; to reflect and to preserve a natural resource that we would die without. From research to realisation, the hypothesis opposes to a utilitarian architecture having so little attention. A promise of childish pleasure – city as a playground. Marrying to a combination of an eco-consciousness of water with the appeal to a desire that people have of their surroundings, to engage and excite them. The really impressive achievement is to respond to that desire with infrastructures that have more than one function.

Antwerp has a lack of designed urban green spaces within the dense urbanised blocks. Finding a way to incorporate a way of green living with natural resources.

A framework and narrative for a heterotopian place that critiques the real value of the natural resources which surround us, the most important natural resource to humankind: water. People who live in cities have access to taps, but the true value of this commodity is lost through it ease of availability, it isn’t valued the same as gold or diamonds.

Heterotopia comes from Greek “Hetero” – other/opposite and “Topos” – place

Utilizing preservation as a driver and bringing the idea of this crisis closer, from global to macro. We begin to reflect, be good to the planet, and have a laugh. Function follows fun. The combination of an environmentally conscious public facility with inhabitable architecture.

To be spectacular, blatant, and memorable, opposing to the idea, and culture which cares so little about aesthetics invests so little indignity in the beauty which supplies and powers our towns and cities.

A counter to the medieval city core, to produce a heterotopian place on the left bank – Linkeroever.

A public facility with the water desalination plant. Bringing a social integration of play and environmental consciousness together. Allowing the interaction of traditionally separate functions to operate and unite as one singular holistic approach.

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Tobias is currently on exchange to the Accademia di architettura di Mendrisio in Ticino, Switzerland. The past semester has been a unique challenge to navigate; starting a semester in a new country and staying through the pandemic. The work shown here is the product of that semester in Atelier Martino Pedrozzi; guided weekly digital tutorials in a bedroom/ studio/ workshop.He believes in the profound interrelation between the practice of architecture, a wider theoretical discourse and other allied fields. His academic work has been driven by a rigour and obsession with process as a means to test and produce critical and provocative interpretations of context and condition.

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Jiaqi is an Interior Designer by training with 5 years of working experience as a Lighting Designer. She is constantly searching for ways to go beyond the perceived norm of objects and spaces. In her attempt at her undergraduate project, she looked beyond the standards of how things should be or used in a space. Her interest in beyond the norm arrived from postmodernism, mainly the art movement of pluralism, ironic, against homogeneity and forced unity. It wanted to celebrate the differences in people instead of creating a singular design to follow. It was largely against modernism and how modernism was not designed for everyone. All of us here are born in the modernist world and as we live by, we transform into our true nature with our own set of expectation and views. We should not conform to the norm of the world just because it is the way it ought to be but instead, look beyond that to find unique ways to celebrate pluralism.

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My practice is informed by the natural world. I am particularly interested in the ways in which nature persists in city environments, despite the overwhelming destructive power of pollution, toxic atmospheres and micro-climates. I have established a making practice that focuses on the relationships between materials and sustainability.

For my final year collection, I designed and made jewellery that relates to a classical idea: res in urbe. This describes an environment where nature is as important a feature of urban design as monumental architecture. The phrase seems particularly relevant today as some city planners and architects have realised the health benefits of green spaces in cities. My jewellery in Finding Nature reflects the textures of leaves, grasses, vegetables and other natural produce. The pieces are intended to evoke sensory experiences when worn or touched; to perhaps act as de-stressors in hostile environments.

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